Mystery plant 016

Imported from Asia, this plant has spread (usually in an unwelcome fashion–considered invasive in Illinois) through most eastern, some midwestern and a few western states in the U.S.  When you know the name of this plant, post a comment with its common name, scientific name and any personal story you’d like to share about this plant.

016-a

New growth in spring

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Young shoot — bark of older plant in background

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Flowering branches on left; leaf branches on right

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Flowers

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Plant with flowers and developing fruits

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Growth habit

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Fruits and leaves

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Fruit (seed pods)

 

ANSWER (subsequently added to this post to facilitate the “search” function for these images):  Goldenrain tree (Koelreuteria paniculata)

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5 Responses to Mystery plant 016

  1. Eva says:

    It looks like Ailanthus altissima or tree of heaven. The leaflets have 2 small asymmetrical lobes at the base and distinctive samaras. Now in British Columbia too. Your photos are excellent. Thanks for the exercises. Great fun!

    • Angelyn says:

      Eva, nice try — but “no.” Actually, Ailanthus altissima was the featured plant as Mystery Plant 008. If you look at that post, you can see the difference between the seed pods of Tree-of-heaven and this mystery plant.

      There is another blog post comparing Ailanthus altissima with a “looks similar” plant. You can find both posts by searching on “ailanthus” in the search box.

  2. Kari says:

    This looks like a golden raintree, Koelreuteria paniculata. Discovered my first one this year because of the seed pods.

    • Angelyn says:

      Hurrah, Kari! You are correct. This is Goldenrain tree (Koelreuteria paniculata). This plant was a tricky one for me to figure out when I first saw it. In fact, it took nearly a year of watching it through the seasons — plus some serendipity — to find its name.

      • Kari says:

        Me too! I guess I just assumed it was a chinaberry until the seed pods showed up. I found it on a popular hike and bike trail on Lady Bird Lake here in Austin. Love the mystery plant challenge; keep ‘em coming!

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